The Business of Life Chapter 29 – and then three come along at once

The New Year of 1997 brought surprises that, for once, were something to celebrate.  Shortly after the world started work once more after the long Christmas break, I had one of my regular review meetings with Phil at KPMG’s offices in Leeds.  “We’ve had a positive response from the last batch of letters I sent out,” Phil informed me, “Metal Spinners up in Newcastle are prepared to meet you.  However, when I spoke with them they told me how much they wanted for the business and it’s more than a bit rich.”  I remembered the business well from the last batch we had discussed and when Phil let on the amount they wanted, I groaned inwardly.The business of life chapter 29

There are many ways of valuing a business but one of the simplest is that of a multiple of sustainable earnings.  Somewhere between 6 and 7 times profit before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation would be a reasonable average for a privately owned manufacturing or engineering business at the time.  The problem was that the figure they had quoted Phil was way above that.  “Sod it,” I responded, “We haven’t had a nibble for a while and the pipeline is a bit depleted, I’ll go and see them.”  We fixed a date for a week or so later and Phil volunteered the services of Crevan, one of his managers, to accompany me.  Perhaps there was some reason not evident in the published accounts as to why they had such an apparently inflated view of the value of their business.  Time would tell.

Back in my office the phone rang a short time later and I had Mark T from 3i on the line.  “We’ve just concluded a management buy out (MBO) of an engineering business in Sheffield and we need a Chairman on the board.  No guarantees that they’ll pick you as we have provided them with the names of a few suitable candidates, but are you interested in having a talk with them?”  A few days later saw me seeking out the address on a small industrial estate on the south side of Sheffield.  The business was housed in old premises and specialised in the production of small batches of bespoke tungsten carbide components and was very profitable.  The business had been bought out by its management (the engineering director and finance director) who now shared the role of MD.  I was given a tour of the facilities and we then discussed the business plan they had used to support their bid.  The meeting seemed to go well and they said they’d let me know when the other candidates had been seen.

The next week Crevan and I made the journey up to Newcastle and met with Clifford the MD and Mike the finance director of Metal Spinners (Newcastle).  The business had been founded in 1953 by Clifford’s father and proved to be spread across numerous sites in Newcastle, Washington, Manchester and Birmingham.  The premises that we saw that first visit were old (like so many UK engineering firms I had seen over the last year or so) but there was something about them that gave off good vibes to me.  I liked the fact that their main process (metal spinning) was very much a niche one and that they had both a major blue chip industrial company as their main customer plus over a thousand others.  The incredibly welcome news was that the business was in fact a group of eight separate companies that were non-consolidated.  The combined turnover and profitability of the group was far higher than I had realised (having only seen one company’s accounts) and put the asking price right back in the realms of the feasible.

The other great news was that the business was not on the market and wouldn’t be if we could deliver a deal on their asking price.  Crevan and I came away with a complete set of books for the total company and pages of notes that we had made during our discussions.  Driving back to Yorkshire we summed up the opportunity; the shareholders seemed willing (although there was an absent shareholder and a family trust), the business was in a highly specialised niche, it was profitable, it had very limited exports and seemed to offer once more the opportunity to acquire smaller competitors and consolidate onto a smaller number of sites.  This was the best opportunity I had seen in a year and a half and it was exactly the type of company I had set out to buy.  Crevan and I agreed a split of the workload needed to assess the business and I headed back to my office to telephone Mark with a briefing on the day’s events.

The following day I received a call from one of the joint MDs in Sheffield.  They had completed their interviewing and wanted to appoint me as chairman if we could agree terms.  A few days later I formally became the non-executive chairman of Hallamshire Hardmetal Products with a requirement to chair monthly board meetings and be on hand to guide strategy, oversee the delivery of the business plan and provide whatever assistance they might require.  The company was run on a relaxed basis but I was pleased that their accounting systems were rigorous and Trevor H and Trevor S (the joint MDs) were easy enough to work with but had an all consuming passion in keeping things simple.  There isn’t a great story to tell but over the next ten years or so we formed a great working relationship, evaluated several businesses, bought a smaller competitor and then staged a further buy out from 3i.  The business never failed to make profits in all these years and was finally sold to a buy-in candidate in 2008.  Sadly, Trevor H never lived to realise the fruits of his labours, dying a short time prior to the sale.

Meanwhile, I was still in the midst of evaluating the Metal Spinners business when Mark T came on the phone once more.  “We have a buy-in deal we’re trying to complete but have a problem with their choice of chairman and are not sure about the business.  Would you like to have a look at the business for us and let us know your views?  If it looks good, we’d like you as investing chairman to lead the team.” There’s a long and tumultuous tale to tell here but suffice for the moment to record that I did approve and complete the deal and became investing chairman of Rothmere Ltd in the first half of 1997.

Over this hectic period I was burning the midnight oil with Mark and KPMG to pull together a heads of agreement with the owners of Metal Spinners.  Earlier that year we had managed to get Clifford and Mike down into the 3i offices in Leeds to thrash out an outline deal.  The sum that they had put on the table had transpired to still be far too expensive once Mark and I had put together a full 5 year projection.  I had discovered Clifford to be volatile and I was concerned as to how the meeting would go.  After an hour or so we had reached what seemed to be a significant hurdle and were well over seven figures apart.  We were also surprised to learn that they had appointed neither lawyers nor accountants to advise them; proving to be both advantageous in the short term and a near disaster later on.  Paul called a breakout and very quickly came up with a plan.

That morning we had received the first set of up to date management accounts and learnt that the business was rapidly building a substantial pile of surplus cash.  Going back into the meeting Paul spelt out (in the absence of any advice of their own) the net proceeds they were likely to walk away with after tax if we delivered the price they were asking.  This wasn’t enough to keep Clifford and Mike happy.  He then asked them what they thought they would be happy receiving after tax.  Having established this figure, Paul then laid out a formula whereby they took a combination of pre-sale dividend of the cash they had build up and took a substantial slice of the proceeds in the form of loan notes spread over the two years following a sale.

This formula of deferred consideration would give us a hefty contribution to our working capital requirements and lessened the upfront investment.  These loan notes together with the pre-sale dividend (their own money) produced a substantially lower overall tax bill that just brought the net proceeds up to the level Clifford and Mike had agreed they wanted to achieve.  In effect they were financing part of the transaction to achieve a lower tax bill.  They agreed and by lunchtime we had a signed copy of heads of agreement on this basis.  As part of the agreement they were giving us a period of exclusivity to enable us to complete the deal during which they would neither approach another prospective purchaser nor would they enter into negotiations with any other party.  The deal was on and it seemed achievable but a vast amount of work needed to be done in terms of due diligence.  A phrase was then uttered by Paul that was to come back to me time and again over the years in every transaction I was a part of,  “The devil’s in the detail.” he cautioned.

A couple of weeks later Mark T called me to ask what my time commitments were like.  By this stage I was chairman of one 3i investment and had recently completed my first MBI as investing chairman of another.  In addition, over the last couple of years I had continued my work with Jerrard Bros Plc and had been appointed chairman the previous year.  I responded that I still had some spare time and asked what he had in mind.  By this time it had become clear to me that, even if I couldn’t pull off the one big acquisition I had set my sights on, I could achieve a very nice portfolio of non-executive roles combined with equity participation.  We agreed to meet the following day.

Sat once more in the 3i offices (where I was beginning to feel at home) I listened to Mark T describe the problem he had.  They had backed the growth plans of a small technology products distributor that had grown extremely rapidly (by around 35% each year) and  had expanded into the USA and Germany.  Profits had been sacrificed for growth but the latest year’s results had produced an unexpected loss of £1m (largely as a result of the US investment).  The shareholders equity was now ‘below water’ and the bank was making ominous noises.  Would I go and meet the two director shareholders and, if they agreed, join the board as a non-executive?  I was subsequently appointed to the board and another rollercoaster ride was about to start.

Over and above my due diligence work on Metal Spinners and maintaining the research and analysis to keep the MBI target pipeline full, I was now working for various periods each month in businesses based in Croydon, Hull, Heathrow and Sheffield with various additional activities in London, Bristol & Birmingham.  I stopped all efforts to win new consulting clients and knew that something would have to give in these activities if I managed to pull off the major acquisition I had been seeking.  I was burning the candle at both ends and in the middle but was enjoying life more than I had for many years.  And any concern about money had disappeared over the previous few months as my portfolio of activities had grown.

My new life as a non-executive & chairman seemed to be the role my career had been building towards.  I was responsible to 3i to ensure that their investments in the companies I had joined produced the results they had planned.  However, this role was legally (and in practice) overridden by my responsibility to all of the shareholders (and in my mind to all of the stakeholders) of these businesses.  My broad experience had provided me with an ability to see these businesses in a wider context than their other directors (whose deep functional & specialist experience certainly exceeded mine).  Freed of the responsibility to manage a day to day role I was able to concentrate on direction, strategy & people (including customers).  These key aspects could only be achieved as a result of the closest working relationships with my fellow directors and their teams.  I was finding my business life to be immensely fulfilling.  Unfortunately, I was also going to find out that it would shortly become vastly more challenging than I could ever have imagined.

Meanwhile, alongside my work and responsibilities with these four companies, I was ploughing every once of energy and expertise I could muster into completing the acquisition of the Metal Spinners group of companies.  I was increasingly confident that I could pull this off but completely unaware of the scale and scope of the problems that were about to emerge in three of the other companies.

Image courtesy of en.wikipedia.org

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