Category Archives: Megalomania

The Business of Life Chapter 25 – when it’s time to pick yourself up

The flight back from Geneva that evening gave me some time and space to get my thoughts together.  There was none of the rage I had felt when I had been fired from Akai 13 years previously.  Instead, what I felt was a mix of great relief and sadness.  The sense of relief had been something I expected, as working for Norman and Eddie would have filled me with horror.  This feeling was vindicated later that same year when a friendly head hunter shared his experience of dealing with Norman  But more of that in due course.

The sadness was an unexpected sensation.  I had spent all those years working for a company in roles that had provided me with enormous challenges, to which I had usually been able to rise.  The company had given me a superb business education, which I have since come to realise was peerless.  It had also provided me with rich and complex problems on which to apply my new found knowledge.  I still count some of the solutions I arrived at to be amongst the greatest successes of my career.  It was sad that middle management had not always been able to step back from their personal positions and embrace a new reality.  Strategic thinking had been subordinated to the protection of personal gain in many cases.  Nevertheless, I knew I was going to miss the company, the challenges it had provided and the people; even the ones who had frustrated the hell out of me.

One worry luckily I didn’t have was financial.  At least I was confident that I would find the next position before money became a problem.  With the savings I had accumulated and the severance pay I had received life wouldn’t be too bad.  I was under no illusions though as the UK was still recovering from a nasty recession.  For the moment I put that from my mind as I had more immediate matters to deal with.  I had an apartment in Geneva with more stuff accumulated over the previous year than would fit into a suitcase and I had to get it back home.  I made plans to drive over in a few days.  Speaking to a couple of my old team I discovered that they had already had a farewell lunch together but on hearing I was returning for a couple of days they decided to do it all over again – with me.

So, after a few days catching up on my sleep and delighting in being back home with Denise, I headed back over the Channel and through France to Geneva for the last time.  The lunch was bitter-sweet.  I was touched that they were all prepared to give up their time to meet with me once more.  It was apparent though that a number felt a lot less philosophical about the situation than me and it was clear that at least a couple were going to find it very tough to get another position as good as the one they had lost.  One saving grace for them was that Swiss welfare payments were a whole lot more generous than the UK but only for a time.  When the hugs and kisses were over we went our individual ways and I began the long drive back.

Back home in Yorkshire my first priority was to shake off the excesses of too many meals and probably too much to drink.  So, Tilly our Rottweiler joined me for long jogs across the moors around our home and gradually I began to feel good both physically and mentally.  Without a break I started work full time on the hunt for the next position.  In the following 6 months I travelled 20,000 miles attending interviews, networking and researching the market.  Contacts I had made were unstinting with their time and advice and the many head hunters I either approached afresh or renewed acquaintance with were generally extremely helpful.  Together with the advice I had previously received from Max, I was becoming more focussed and more professional in my approach.

Discussing the very exact profile a client had drawn up for a position I was reviewing with an extremely helpful recruitment consultant he suddenly enquired, “It was the same Norman that had run FKI that bought your old company, wasn’t it?”  When I nodded he went on, “God you had a lucky escape!  I had a brush with him a few years back.  He contacted me and said he was looking for half a dozen MDs.  Well”, he went on, “I thought Christmas had come early, so I asked Norman to let me have candidate profiles and I’d get back to him with a plan and an invoice for the amount we charge upfront.”  It seems Norman had responded, “Don’t waste my time with stuff like that, just get me the candidates and I’ll see if I like any of them.”

Things were certainly a lot tougher than they had been the last time I was ‘between positions’.  I was that much older, that much more senior and the number of openings higher up the greasy pole were that much fewer.  It became clear quite quickly that, despite my extensive contacts, I wasn’t going to walk into a senior role in the industry I had just left.  I think I was known as someone with strong views and a different perspective on things and that didn’t appeal to many.  In any case longevity in position was a hallmark of the industry I had been in and there was no game of musical chairs to join in.  Moving industries once again looked the most likely route back into gainful employment.  This bothered me not one jot as I had already worked in 6 diverse sectors and had found problems were invariably generic.

Drawing on the experiences I had accrued in my role in Geneva I reflected on the behavioural skill set that my role had really needed.  When I compared this with the psychometric feedback I had received over the previous few years, I realised that I had really been a square peg trying to fit a round whole.  Whilst the experience and knowledge I possessed had been more than sufficient for the role, my behavioural profile lacked the key political skills required.  I had the influencing skill alright but I clearly lacked what Phil Thurston at Harvard had referred to as ‘rat like cunning’.  My first approach to a problem or resistance was usually to summon the power of logic and rationality.  If that didn’t work I rarely shied away from a full blown, full frontal attack.  I could build and receive the loyalty and support of a team, I could understand the biggest of pictures and what was required to solve the underlying problems.  Yes, there was much I could learn of politics but, as I saw things, I was far more suited to leading than being led.

But my mind was beginning to move in a different direction.  During the final months in Geneva I had started to think of working alone as a consultant and had sounded out a few people I knew who had created successful careers in this way.  The advice had been to specialise rather than risk being known as a jack of all trades.  The obvious specialism was marketing strategy and I was pondering the prospect of setting up and promoting my own business when, in one of those amazingly serendipitous moments, my phone rang.

The call was from Gerard, the finance director of an old customer I had known for many years whilst with SylvaniaUK.  He explained that they had a problem he felt I might be able to assist with.  Was I interested in meeting to discuss the situation?  A few days later I travelled down to Croydon to meet Gerard and Steve, the MD of Jerrard Bros PLC.  The company had been founded by Steve’s father and uncle, had done well for many years but now required a new supplier of a key product.  Would I help them?  I said I would let them have a proposal.  During the visit it became clear that the company had reached a plateau over the previous few years and I probed for reasons.  I said I would also let them have some thoughts on working with them to address this issue also.  A couple of weeks later and after some good natured negotiation we had a business relationship based on two projects.

Almost straightaway I received two more approaches for significant projects and following discussions, proposals and more negotiations I found myself engaged to complete both.  One was a feasibility study for a foreign manufacturer looking to enter the UK market and the other was assisting a company looking to acquire one of my old, major competitors.  Very quickly I became extremely busy and drew a halt to any idea of seeking a new employed role.  I revelled in the freedom of working on projects that interested me at my own pace (although to agreed deadlines).   By now it was summer and I fell into a routine that, when I wasn’t travelling, I often cycled long distances in the Dales.  I would start early and return by midday and then work through until mid evening.  I had always found cycling conducive to thought and now I could actually keep fit whilst doing something I really enjoyed and apply my mind to various problems at the same time.

During my job hunting process I had followed a highly targeted approach seeking opportunities that had not even been advertised.  Each day I would scour the business press looking for news items concerning major companies that were either contemplating or had made major investments or acquisitions.  Whenever I came across a situation where I felt I could add value I would write to the chairman or chief executive (often to their home address so my letter wouldn’t be screened by a secretary).  I would either compliment them on their success or wish them luck with their plans and then spell a short but precisely targeted couple of sentences laying out how my experience could assist.  I would follow these letters up with a call aiming to achieve a meeting.  Several of these approaches got me in front of senior people.  I hadn’t succeeded in getting a new job from this approach but I decided I could use the experience to win new clients.

Another opportunity for creativity had arisen when I lost out after being down to the final two for a position running a national chain of builders’ merchants.  Having invested the time to carry out a great deal of background research on the firm and its competitors I thought it would be foolish to waste it.  I called the new MD, introduced myself as the guy who came second, congratulated him and suggested we meet as I had a proposition.  He was sufficiently intrigued to agree to meet me.  When we met I made the suggestion that as he was busy getting to grips with a big new role there was a way I could help.  He listened very carefully to what I had to say about the industry, the position of his company and the issues I had identified.  He considered for what seemed an age and then said he would be pleased to receive a proposal.  I went away and submitted a detailed proposal for a very focussed consultancy project.  He accepted but not before something else got in the way.

Towards the end of my period of applying for jobs I met a head hunter with whom I had established a good relationship.  Out of the blue he called me months later to say he had an assignment he felt was well suited to my experience.  We met and I listened to the facts he laid before me.  His client was Ross Group a small UK PLC with a number of businesses in electrical products.  They were seeking an MD for one of the group companies, Selmar Industries, itself a group of three businesses manufacturing in West Yorkshire.  The previous MD had departed after running up losses of £3.0m.  Smelling a dead horse, I declined to take matters further.  However, a couple of weeks later he was back on the phone pushing me to meet the Group MD at the company’s factory, “It’s just down the road from you, I’m sure you’ll get on famously with Neil and if you still decide it’s till not for you, well fine.”

The following week I duly arrived at Selmar’s factory, which was housed in old mill premises in a tight, wooded valley on the outskirts of Brighouse.  My heart sank; it looked a tip.  However, my head hunter chum was right about Neil with whom I quickly established a rapport.  He had also worked in major corporations and there was a basic understanding between us over how businesses should be run.  Nevertheless, after several hours of discussions I politely declined to take matters any further.  A week later Neil came on the phone to chat and pressed me to meet the chairman, “Nothing to lose, see what he has to say, eh?”  A long trip down to Basingstoke the following week produced a firm offer, which I rejected.  They responded with an improvement and promises.  By this stage, I have to admit, it had become something of a game, so I pushed on and won more concessions.  Finally I accepted but not before I had negotiated approval to continue my work with Jerrard Bros.

I was back running a group of businesses and was confident that I could improve them.  Would it work out?  Or had my pugnacious nature set me up for trouble again?

 Image courtesy of Eliasbadi.com

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The Business of Life Chapter 24 – can success come from losing?

I had settled into the pattern of a weekly commuter.  Monday mornings would see Denise dropping me off at Leeds-Bradford airport to catch the first flight down to Heathrow where I would switch terminals to catch the next Swissair flight.  Because of the time difference, I didn’t get into the office much before noon.  On Fridays I managed to flee the office by late afternoon in time to catch the BA flight to Manchester where I had arrangements with a local taxi firm to pick me up.  Frequently, I would be making mid-week trips to one or more of our subsidiaries or meeting with two of my direct reports who were based in our factories in Nuremburg and Tienen (Belgium).  Evenings in Geneva would have me either entertaining visitors or taking dinner on my own in one of the small local restaurants.  Given the uncertainty of the situation, it was my intent to save as much of my Swiss salary as I could.

Highlights were the weekends when Denise came over to Geneva.  We would visit some of the restaurants in the city centre or in the small villages on both sides of the lake.  We travelled around as much as we could at weekends and also managed to take a couple of short breaks walking in the mountains.  We also had a great week when my daughter Victoria also came to visit (marred somewhat by meetings I was required to attend).  Sundays were never a complete success when Denise came to stay as it seemed as if we were simply killing time until the time came to drive her to the airport.  The realisation that we were going to spend yet another week apart would cast a gloom over the day however much we tried to divert our attention with lunch out or trips further afield.  There was always that flight to catch and the growing realisation that the sale of the company would provide little of benefit to me.  I had pretended to myself that it might not happen (maybe no-one would want to buy us) but now the reality kicked in.

The meeting with our prospective buyers was a dispiriting occasion that only served to prove to me that, whilst our own senior management might have had no strategy for long term success, this lot had even less.  The reality was a management buy-in team (MBI) backed by CVC Capital Partners represented by Michael Smith, CVC’s CEO.  Michael Smith came across well enough but said nothing of substance to enlighten us of the plans they had for the business.  The management team comprised Norman Scoular (ex CEO of a small UK conglomerate) and another individual, Eddie Bartlett, who I can only describe (on his subsequent behaviour) as Norman’s enforcer.  Norman, pleasant enough on the surface, also said little of substance except to talk of personal responsibility for personal targets.  In turn, Eddie droned on repeating most of Norman’s utterances as if he believed that the repetition would somehow add weight to the vacuous comments.  The only concrete aspect to emerge was that we were now into the due diligence phase of the sale process.  We were instructed by our new prospective masters to respond to any questions they asked to the fullest extent of our knowledge

There was no mistaking the wealth in Switzerland, with fine houses, exotic cars, expensive shops and starred restaurants everywhere.  The Credit Suisse cash machine situated in the lobby of our building had a disconcerting habit of dispensing nothing smaller than a 200 Swiss Franc note.  This was probably fine if you were pulling out a wad of these in one of the many Michelin starred restaurants in town but was a definite problem if your intended destination was merely the local bar!  However, wealth had its positive side and my Swiss bank balance was growing nicely as a result of my abstemious lifestyle.

Having assembled my evidence on the malign effects of the bonus scheme on stock levels across Europe, I decided to discuss the matter first with Alain (VP HR).  A large Belgian man who took an equal pride in his systems and procedures as he did in attempting to demonstrate the correctness of his views regardless of the subject, he listened with growing impatience.  “Listen,” he finally roared, “I spent a vast amount of time putting our incentive scheme together and I’m not about to change it on the basis of some flimsy information!”  Knowing that little happened on the HR front without Alain’s consent I argued to myself that, without Alain’s agreement, Don was unlikely to listen either.  Instead, I decided on a different tack.  We had a general managers’ meeting due for the next week so I merely told Don that I needed a substantial time slot to impress on the assembled group the importance of accurate sales forecasting.  He agreed and the time was duly allotted for late morning.  I worked on my presentation until I was absolutely confident that the logic and rationality were impeccable.

The day of the meeting dawned fine and sunny but as the meeting room started to fill I discovered that neither Don nor Swaanen were present.  I had a quick word with Germaine who informed me that Don, Swaanen and Dan (VP Finance) had decided to play golf in Evian and wouldn’t be back until lunchtime.  I tried to rearrange the agenda to put my slot back until the afternoon but found that this wasn’t possible.  I therefore either had to withdraw the subject from the agenda or go ahead without Don.  By this stage I had no alternative but to proceed.  It was conceivable that Swaanen had got wind of what I was planning and had decided to encourage Don to take the morning off.  Events would later prove at least my first supposition to be correct.

For this meeting I had decided that the issue of the bonus scheme was not relevant, it being purely a head office decision if a change was to be made.  Instead I was intending to focus on the need of minimising stock levels across Europe and the vital importance of letting the DRP system play its role.  For the presentation I had made slides of the graphs generated by DRP showing the accuracy of the system sales forecasts versus country amended ones and the actual results.  In order not to be confrontational all the information I showed was without any country identification.  Instead I had prepared an envelope for each of the general managers enclosing the results for their country that I handed out at the end.  I made known the saving we could make if everyone could trust the DRP generated forecasts and I asked for their support.  Wishful thinking.

All hell broke loose.  Ignoring the incontrovertible evidence in front of them I was attacked on all sides by men who argued black was white.  I knew that there was a degree of animosity existing between country managers and the factory managers who supplied them but I had simply not expected this outcome.  There was simply no-one in the room who was prepared to even acknowledge that their forecasting could be improved.  By the time Don appeared he wasn’t interested in becoming involved in the subject and quickly moved the meeting on to the next agenda item.  I had failed in two battles but I hadn’t given up.

The following week we had a meeting scheduled in London for Monday and that evening I travelled back to Geneva with Don & Alain.  As we had time to kill we decided to eat at Heathrow and over dinner I raised the stock and bonus subject with Don, going over the full facts.  For some reason Don would not acknowledge that there was anything wrong with either the stock or the bonus systems that couldn’t be put right by my team reviewing every single product line forecast for every country every month.  It was both an illogicality and an impossibility and I told him so.  Don disputed this and we went around the subject again but with voices getting louder with every sentence.  Alain stated that the bonus system had no part to play in the situation.  I reminded them of the investment that had been made in the DRP system and that it was being ignored by everyone.  By this time we were all shouting at each other in the middle of the restaurant.  In the end I said that I could not achieve better than the existing system.  But, if he was serious about making an improvement, he should take the whole logistics function away from Swaanen and give it to me to manage and I would commit to making it work.  We were by now red faced and out of breath but Don brought things to a close by agreeing with my proposal.

The following day I went into the logistics department to request that a further analysis I needed be produced.  Sheepishly and with great embarrassment the team informed me that Swaanen had that morning instructed them to not even speak to me again.  When I got to see Don he also looked embarrassed and said that upon reflection overnight he had changed his mind and I must proceed as he had originally instructed.  I had lost the war.  By connivance and weak management we were wasting $10m a year in working capital and no-one wanted to even look at the root causes.  I couldn’t give up.

By this time it was clear that, unless a last minute disaster occurred, the transaction to sell the business would complete.  Feeling less and less respect for the senior team I gave up the daily ritual of lunch with them and started eating instead with one or other members of my team (something that was far more relaxing).  In a last ditch effort to preserve something of the work I had put into the goal I had been given and the findings I had made, I told Norman that I would appreciate a meeting with him as soon as possible.  The problem was that he seemed always to be travelling.  Meanwhile, Christmas was approaching and I decided to drive back to England with my son Alex.  He had been attending a French language school in Chambery, had come to the end of his course, and needed a lift home.  We enjoyed the time together and it made a pleasant change from air travel.  Christmas passed too quickly and it was soon time to return.

A harsh winter had descended upon Europe after Christmas and by the time I drove back across France the temperature was showing -18C.  I had tried to keep the situation out of my mind over Christmas but as I drove along near deserted autoroutes the situations I faced looked decidedly unattractive.   If the sale by some chance fell through it was clear that my role was going to become increasingly more difficult. I had a brain that wanted to understand the big picture and address the things that influenced it.  The problem was that I had neither the skills nor the inclination to enter into politics.  I had also by now made myself something of a pariah amongst the senior team in Geneva by fighting without fear or favour for what I knew to be right.  On the other hand if, or now more likely when, the sale went through I faced new management that seemed to hold views that were an anathema to me.

Finally, in January I met Norman for dinner one evening.  He wanted to know my views on the business, which suited me just fine.  I gave him an overview that I felt was realistic and showed opportunities.  I took him through an abbreviated version of the stock saga and shared with him the savings that could be made in working capital. However, Norman surprised me with his response that indicated he had little or no interest in the DRP system and that country managers should take responsibility for their own stock levels.  They should be completely responsible for their own results.  We talked on but it became clear that in terms of modern management thinking, Norman was back in the Stone Age.  Newco was not going to possess a culture that would play to my experience, training or skills.  A new threat wormed its way into my consciousness; what if they did want me?  A great concern.  I also had to pick up the bill.

A week or so later we got the news that the transaction had completed and Norman and his team marched into the offices.  Don had disappeared and then Norman promptly got on a plane to somewhere.  Eddie quickly took up his role as enforcer with relish.  As will have become apparent by now my view was that whilst many of the problems in the industry were structural, we certainly hadn’t made the best of the hand we had drawn.  However, that is different from some diminutive clown telling us we had all been complete idiots.  The only thing of note that happened that first week was that business class travel was banned and we all received a long lecture from Eddie on the need to save money and how life was going to change.  I’m not sure what motivational training Eddie had had but he wasn’t a patch on my old headmaster at the art of bollocking.  Life at the back of the plane on Friday evening wasn’t too bad but the signs for the future were.

A few days into the following week Alain called me into his office.  Looking less like his usual bombastic self than I could ever have imagined he fidgeted and launched into the worse version of a HR scripted Dear John speech I had ever heard.  I put my hand up to halt him, “Don’t worry about the niceties, Alain” I smiled, “Just be good enough to tell me if this lot are going to honour my contract?”  It was with relief that he nodded and handed me the paper laying out the terms of my severance, which were exactly as my contract.  Alain went on to tell me that my whole team was to be fired with just one exception   He held out his hand for my office and car keys.

At the age of 47 and after 13 years of constant commitment and effort to the organisation that had given me more highs and lows than I can now recall, I was out of work once more.

Postscript

The North American business of GTE Sylvania was sold to Siemans shortly prior to CVC purchasing the European and Rest of World business.  Europe and ROW was subsequently sold on by CVC some years later and has passed through several ownerships since.  The business is currently owned by an Indian conglomerate and was the subject of an article in the Sunday Times (22 July 12) describing the difficulties they had in changing the company culture.  

My inactivity in the ‘non-job’ referred to above did not in fact stop me from carrying out a very detailed research project to establish the viability of the Linolite brand.  The results I obtained indicated that attempting to extend the brand’s franchise was not a viable proposition; this was ignored and the product range I had developed was rebranded Linolite despite my stiff opposition.  Today the Linolite brand is no longer owned by Sylvania (which has gone on to develop its very successful industrial and commercial lighting fittings identity) and appears to have a very limited market presence.

Greg retired to Florida where I understand he still lives.  Don now works for a small venture capital company owned by a past GTE Sylvania president.  Alain still lives in Geneva where he runs a successful multinational HR consultancy.  Swaanen was persuaded to stay with the business.

Norman died on Swissair flight 111 in a crash over the Atlantic in September 1998.

Image courtesy of  www.Fecielo.com

The business of life (chapter 16 – grim up North)

After just three months and 79 applications I had secured a new position that seemed to offer the future I sought.   Arguably it was at the same level as my previous role.  Yes, it had a narrower functional focus but it was with a division of GTE, a major US corporation, and I was earmarked as the replacement for the current UK managing director.  Sylvania Lighting, the company I was joining, was exclusively involved in industrial and commercial sectors that were completely new to me.  I had a lot to learn.

On a Sunday evening early in December 1980, I waved off my family who had spent the weekend with me in Yorkshire house-hunting.  I got an early night in preparation for the start of my new job the following day.  Sleep didn’t come easily due to a combination of an incredibly noisy heating system in my hotel room and the thoughts that kept crowding into my mind.  All of my marketing training and experience at this point (and the majority of what was taught at that time in the UK) focussed exclusively on consumer marketing.  The only information that my research had uncovered on marketing in industrial sectors was a very short pamphlet from The Industrial Society in London.  This was very different ground to the exciting sectors I had been involved with up to this point and the concepts kept going round in my mind as I struggled to sleep.

Feeling like death warmed over after what felt like only 5 minutes sleep I presented myself at the office and tried to appear bright and raring to go to John, my new boss.  Quickly introduced to everyone in my new team (all three of them) and the rest of the office based staff I took a briefing from John.  Having only acquired the manufacturing assets of an old established British company approximately 5 years previously, the business imported 85% of the range of products sold in the UK from other European group factories and exported 90% of our own factories’ output to the rest of the world wide group.  Following an initial period of UK growth sales had run out of steam.  Competition came in the form of Philips, Thorn & GEC, all long established and major companies.  My task was to construct a strategy to grow against these industry giants.

After sitting down with my new team I felt very alone.  They were warm, friendly and eager enough but had limited experience and low levels of initiative.  Meeting the rest of the management team revealed that Bob the finance director was the perfect caricature of the Scottish FD.  Mike the operations director seemed competent and friendly but both seemed somewhat reserved about my role. The really bright spots were Martyn the Sales Manager, a great guy with whom I shared photographic industry experience, and Andrew the HR director who I had met at interview.  I felt I could work well with these two.

I spent the remainder of the day trying to find industry & company information I could use for analysis & planning.  Before we left the office, Martyn suggested we had dinner together as we were staying in the same hotel (he also being in the process of relocating and a weekly commuter).  The evening was good fun and it became increasingly clear that we were going to have a great working relationship.  After a few pre-dinner drinks in the bar (it had been a long day), we sat down to eat and enjoy a bottle of wine.  Towards the end of the meal, Martyn waved the empty wine bottle and suggested, “Shall we have the other one?” I recall that I must have responded in the affirmative as I awoke the next morning with the most appalling hangover.  Somehow I managed to blag my way through the day, vowing all the time that I would never touch another drop.

Following my week in the hotel, John suggested I rent a flat as it would be both more economical and convenient for the time it would take to find and move into the house of my choice.  A large loft apartment was soon located in a quiet leafy suburb and it was suggested that I share with Cliff, an American student who was on secondment to us.  Cliff was an ideal flat sharing colleague as his interests and daily routines ensured we rarely ever met except in the office.  Immediately we moved in the key problem with the apartment became apparent – it was totally devoid of insulation.  With a combination of heaps of additional blankets & a huge electricity bill we would make it through a very cold winter.

Over the next few weeks it began to emerge that not only was John a curious character, but he was an absolute bully to his team.  The bullying took the form of a continuous need to be seen not simply to be the leader but to be right in any and every situation.  He appeared to be incapable of trusting anyone to carry out their role without his interfering.  That I knew little of industrial marketing I was well aware but John’s lack of understanding of the entire purpose and practice of marketing was verging on the complete.  This was however a deficiency that never prevented him from pontificating on the subject.

He was also exceptionally parsimonious; one of that select band who know the price of everything and the value of nothing but carried to an extreme. On one occasion he drove to London early one morning to attend a trade fair and drove back again that afternoon to show his face in the office.  He then went home, changed and drove down to London again to attend a dinner before driving back up to Yorkshire once more in the early hours.  The following day he made it known that he had saved the company money in this way (by driving around 1,000 miles in a day)!

However, the event that really began to send the doubts that were gnawing away in my mind into overdrive was the Christmas staff function.  John invited the whole management group to his house for drinks before dinner, which was fine but it merely served to demonstrate that his obsessive compulsive behaviour was not confined to the world of business (his poor wife….).  We then moved to a local pub where John had booked a function room for dinner.  The meal was simple and I kept well away from John and used the opportunity to become better acquainted with my new colleagues.  At the end of the evening I witnessed an event that, even today, I still cannot really believe I saw.  John went around the room collecting up glasses that still had wine in them and poured the contents into several empty wine bottles.  “Waste not, want not.” he opined when he saw that I was watching him.

Driving home for the Christmas break my mind was in turmoil with the conflicting experiences of the last month plaguing me.  The challenges of the job had got to me and I was convinced I could devise a suitable strategy for growth but it would not be a five minute task.  I had to have the freedom to explore on my own and I was growing less tolerant of John’s style by the day.  I had turned down two other roles and they kept returning to my mind; perhaps they had not yet made an appointment?  I realised that I would be in a very weak negotiating position if I pursued that route.  The four hour journey gave me plenty of time to mull things over and by the time I neared HenleyI had decided to give my role one more try.  I was a fighter and I was determined to make things work if there was a chance.

Back in Yorkshireafter a wonderful Christmas with the family, I started to review the task before me. The meagre information I had on industrial marketing (the one brief pamphlet) suggested that if it was not possible to differentiate the product itself (a cornerstone of consumer marketing) then attention should turn to differentiating everything other than the product.  It was quite clear that our product range was totally non-differentiated with every product made to a set of harmonised industry standards.  Construction of a complete marketing strategy that differentiated our company and our strategy was the great priority; it was what I had been recruited to do.  But I had John to contend with and I had to get him out of the way while I worked on the planning and then get him onside for whatever the solution transpired to be.

Then one of those serendipitous events took place that was to change things overnight. John called a meeting one afternoon and around six of us crammed into his office (in the old office we lacked even one meeting room).  With the heating pumping out and the windows and doors closed to exclude noise it soon became stifling; I undid the top button of my shirt and undid my tie. “We keep our shirts buttoned at all times in this office” barked John.  I was, to use a newly acquired local expression, gobsmacked and quickly responded, “That’s simply ridiculous.” and left my shirt how it was. John glared at me for an age and then moved on to what became another of his usual uninspiring meetings.  As the meeting concluded, without thinking and probably remembering the general office was considerably cooler, I did up my top button, restored my tie to full mast and walked out to the gents to relieve myself.

I had barely concluded matters when John burst in announcing, “I need to talk to you in my office, now!” Ready for a fight and thinking that I couldn’t take his petty bullying any longer, I followed and quickly became astounded back in his office.  “You disagreed with me earlier,” he started in on me, “in front of my management and wouldn’t back down.  But before you left my office you made it clear that you would comply with my rules and I just want you to know that I respect that.  Now, how’s the house hunting going?”  From that moment on, John changed his attitude towards me, even seeking my views in front of others and then making it clear that he would back them.  He also gave me the time and space to concentrate on my key goal, something that consumed my full attention.

Just as I was starting to enjoy my role something more serious occurred that rocked my world.  A couple of years back my old boss Gordon had introduced me to Norton Warburg, a financial investment and asset management company.  I had been persuaded by their presentation and seemingly very professional manner to place my savings with them for investment. The actual sum today would seem slight but it represented well over a year’s earnings for me then.  The money had been duly invested and it had produced not only a very good yield but, due to some highly effective financial planning available at the time, was very tax efficient.  I was relying on these savings to help finance my move to Yorkshire.  One Friday afternoon I had spoken to my advisor and informed him that I would require access to the money at short notice.  He came back to me with the suggestion that the Bradford & Bingley were offering a very good rate for short notice investments.  We agreed he should make the switch.

Early the next Monday I set out on my usual drive from Henley on Thames up to West Yorkshire.  Breaking the journey on the M1, I bought my usual copy of the Financial Times, which I started to flick through as I sipped my cup of the usual foul motorway coffee.  When I came to the business section I was stopped in my tracks by a story that indicated that over the weekend Norton Warburg had been placed into administration and that first indications were that it was doubtful that creditors would receive any recovery.  I went cold.  The thought of losing my savings was more than I could bear to contemplate.  I found a payphone and called their number only to be told that the administrator was not taking calls from creditors; I would have to wait until he was ready to make an announcement in due course.

I drove the rest of the way to the office in a state of shock.  There must be something I could do.  Surely, I couldn’t have lost all that money?  Or could I?